Will Google’s Mobile-Friendly Algorithm Change Impact AdWords?

April 14th, 2015 by Brad Garlin

Google-Mobile-Friendly-Algorithm-ChangeWe’ve been hearing from clients who are concerned about Google’s approaching mobile-friendly algorithm change. Per Google’s recent announcement, “Starting April 21, we will be expanding our use of mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal. This change will affect mobile searches in all languages worldwide and will have a significant impact in our search results.”

Now advertisers are reasonably questioning if this change will also impact mobile results on AdWords. All indications are that this change will not impact AdWords at this time. Google has not made any mention about this change impacting AdWords, and historically they have pre-announced changes similar to this well in advance of it actually happening. It certainly stands to reason that this same algorithm change may eventually also apply to AdWords, but it doesn’t appear likely to have an impact with this upcoming algorithm change. Google’s shareholders would certainly be none-to-pleased if Google abruptly shut down a substantial number of their mobile advertisers without even giving any warning, plus they would be creating a huge headache for themselves by needing to deal with confused and upset advertisers; That just wouldn’t make any sense on multiple levels.  So should advertisers be concerned about making their website mobile friendly according to Google, and what should they do right now?

The first thing I personally suggest is for website owners to review Google Analytics results to determine exactly how much traffic is actually generated from Google mobile organic results. In many cases, I have seen that Google mobile organic traffic represents an incredibly small portion of overall total traffic. Based on this reality, I am not too concerned about Google’s upcoming algorithm change for those businesses.

For others who are are receiving a decent amount of Google mobile organic traffic, this change is very important and should be addressed immediately if it has not been already. Google said the new algorithm will start rolling out on April 21st and will take a few days to a week to fully implement. They also stated that websites are either mobile-friendly or not, with no degrees of mobile-friendliness, at least not at this time. The fastest way to see if a web pages is mobile-friendly according to Google  is to check it with Google’s mobile-friendly testing tool.

If you are an AdWords advertiser, the next thing to review is how much mobile PPC traffic you are generating. If AdWords mobile traffic is relevant and converts, then making sure that your website is mobile-friendly according to Google is likely a good idea to start taking into consideration. I would suspect that it is just a matter of time until mobile-friendliness does impact AdWords advertisers, and it’s always better to be prepared in advance rather than need to rush to get something done by a specific deadline… especially if is really important and related to technology. Over the years, I have seen over and over again that website development often takes twice as long and costs twice as much as planned. So even if your AdWords account is generating favorable results from mobile traffic, you likely have nothing to worry about right now. However, I strongly encourage advertisers in this position to consider looking into making their websites mobile-friendly according to Google. It’s always a good idea to cater to best-practices that Google suggests, so exploring mobile-friendly web design is likely a good idea for every business, but of course that could be said about many things that require time and money. Therefore my suggestion is to review Google Analytics, review Google AdWords, and then determine how high of a priority making your website mobile-friendly to Google should be on your to-do list.


Doing Your Own PPC Management Will Lose You Money in the Long Run

April 8th, 2015 by Linda Puchyr

7-Reasons-For-PPC-ManagementResearch shows that 93% of online experiences start with a search engine query. With a figure like that, it should be no surprise that 85% of retailers in one survey said that search marketing (pay-per-click advertising and search engine optimization) is the best way to get new customers. PPC alone can get a 300% or higher return on the initial investment.

But once you’ve decided to implement a PPC campaign, you’re probably going to be asking another question: Should I try to manage my PPC efforts on my own, or hire a professional PPC management company? Here are seven reasons we think that the latter is a much smarter financial decision in the long run:

1. Keyword Research Is Complicated
Keyword research for PPC may sound simple — just find out what people are searching for and then bid on those terms — but it’s actually quite a bit more involved than that. For your campaign to work, you need to choose relevant keywords, find out what your competitors are ranking on, and not overspend on low-performing keywords.

2. Ad Copy Needs to Convert
Writing ad copy is a specialized skill best left to professional PPC management experts; if searchers see your ad but it’s not compelling enough for them to actually click on it and then become a customer, then your money is being wasted.

3. Landing Pages Must Be Relevant
One of the biggest mistakes people who don’t consult with professional PPC management agencies make is not optimizing the connections between PPC ads and landing pages. This is hugely important when it comes to conversions.

4. Tracking Is Key for High ROI
In order to get the maximum return on a PPC campaign, you can’t just set it up and leave it alone. PPC campaigns need constant assessment to see which keywords are paying off and which aren’t, and an established PPC management agency has the expertise to do that far more accurately and efficiently than you can.

5. You Have to Know the Lingo
You know that PPC stands for pay per click. What about CPC, CPM or CPA? What’s the difference between views, impressions and hits? While you can do a quick Google search to find out what these terms mean on a surface level, truly understanding them and how they add up to a successful PPC strategy takes up significant amounts of time that are better spent focusing on your business’ core competencies.

6. Ad Networks Differ
You’re probably most familiar with paid search as it relates to Google, but Google AdWords isn’t the only platform that can get attention for your audience. Professionals can help you identify on which ad networks your money will be best spent.

7. PPC Is an Evolving Industry
Just like any other marketing segment, PPC is constantly evolving. Staying on top of trends is vital to making the most of your campaigns, and it’s a better long-term investment to have someone who is already spending time paying attention to every shift handling your PPC advertising.


Protect Your Brand Name with PPC Advertising

April 1st, 2015 by Mike Tatge

BLOG-ProtectYourBrandNameHave you ever wondered (or possibly experienced), what it would be like to have your brand name lost to your competition and never return? Maybe it was even lost to some cheap copy of your brand, just because you were not able to capture the attention of the searcher by not securing the top position within the search engine results page (SERP)? Advertisers are constantly looking for creative ways to attract and bring searchers to their websites to gain new customers and increase overall sales. So you need to ask yourself: are you doing enough to protect your brand in relation to Pay Per Click Advertising?

Why Protect Your Brand Name

A popular discussion usually arises when discussing PPC advertising strategies for brand names. Should companies bid on their own brand name? Some critics believe focusing on the brand name for PPC advertisement is a waste of advertising budget. But I ask you this, if you feel that relying on your organic results are enough to protect your name, are two ads better than one, or possibly none? What if your brand is not listed organically in the top position or even on the first page ?

Failing to bid on your branded name will leave the ad space wide open for your competition. Many crafty advertisers will create a competitor Ad Group, and will include keywords of every name of their direct competition in all match types to ensure their ads are displayed when someone searches those branded keywords. Failing to bid on your own brand name keyword phrases may allow competitors to place ads in a higher position than your organic or natural results.

Cover All Your Bases

If you have a strong organic presence for your own name and you add a PPC campaign as well, you should dominate the entire page. This will leave little room for your competitors to gain any real estate and exposure. Research has shown that searchers expect respectable organizations to come up in the top results of Google, Bing, or Yahoo SERPs.

If your company or website is new and your brand name does not have a strong organic presence yet – a well crafted PPC campaign can get your company’s brand name placed in the #1 position tomorrow.

From a bidding perspective, branded keywords within a PPC campaign are usually the least costly of all keywords. They will also increase your quality score by a higher click through rate (CTR), ad relevance, and better landing page experience. A well-designed PPC campaign provides your brand the right exposure and helps contribute to your SERP ranking, with paid and organic results. Moreover, it ensures your customers are not lost to copycat brands.

The Bottom Line is Sales

The easiest sales should be the ones you make when someone is actually searching for your brand name or company. To ensure they find you online, it’s important to make sure you are making it as easy as you possibly can for them to find you; that includes not allowing your competition to steal your customers.

While there are many factors to consider when developing these campaigns, there’s something more to consider if your company provides a service or a product. What is the total dollar value you place on that customer as a life-long client? Once that customer commits to purchasing from you, they will likely look for your brand name to find your company online again. If your brand name is not easily found, they might end up clicking on one of your competitor’s ads, therefore losing the lifetime value of that customer.

The bottom line is that bidding on your branded name keywords is your best defense against brand name advertising customer theft. So while advertising on your brand name might be an addition to your budget, it certainly is not a waste.