Google AdWords Call-Only Campaigns

April 28th, 2015 by Krystal Urlaub

BLOG-CallOnlyCampaignsWith more and more consumers searching on their smart phones for products and services, the need for mobile advertising is more important and valuable than ever for businesses. According to Google, 70% of mobile searchers call a business directly from search results. To address this, Google recently introduced a new campaign type called Call-Only Campaigns.

This is exciting news for advertisers who rely heavily on driving calls to their business. Now with this new AdWords campaign type, consumers will see your ad text with your phone number, call button and business name on their mobile devices. Once a consumer clicks on your ad, they will only be able to call you and will not have the option of being directed to your website.

One of the reasons that this new campaign type is so exciting has to do with the way you can now structure your mobile bids. Currently the only option to increase your mobile bids is to apply a mobile bid adjustment that uses your desktop bid as the baseline. For example, if you are currently bidding a $1 for the keyword “ppc advertiser” and have your mobile bid multiplier set to increase your bid by 100%, your max mobile bid CPC would then be $2. The potential issue with this type of bidding strategy is that if you need to raise your baseline bid, your mobile bid automatically increases and can quickly grow.

With the new Call-Only Campaign you can now bid for calls based on your target CPA, ROAS or by applying a manual max CPC. You also now have the ability to set your max CPC bids at the keyword level instead of a mobile multiplier at the ad group level. It’s important when setting these bids to remember that you are now bidding based on how much a phone call is worth to you and not a click to your website.

Google AdWords and Targeting Location Groups

March 2nd, 2015 by Michael Marchese

BLOG-TargetingLocationGroupsWhen it comes to targeting specific demographics, sometimes keywords are just not enough of a filter. But there is a hidden option to assist in this endeavor!  Within the Adwords location targeting group is a nifty little feature called location groups which allows you to more closely target specific groups, such as places of interest and household income.  Although both features are not as robust as one may hope, they do add an extra level of targeting unattainable with just keywords.

Locations by places of interest – airports, central commercial areas and universities

With this category the targeting options available are airports, central commercial areas (includes big malls) and universities.  You start by choosing a location such as Chicago and then select one of the above three options. If you were to choose airports, Adwords will target any airport within that location area. You can also choose to go broad by targeting the entire US and in effect target every major US airport.  In this particular instance Google suggests, but does not require, targeting Chicago by itself in addition to the airports within Chicago, and then increasing the bid adjustment for the airport locations.  The reason given for this method is that getting granular can sometimes have the effect of unintentionally eliminating relevant traffic.  The same theory holds true for central commercial areas and universities.

Locations by demographics – select household income tier (top 10% >$146K, 11-20% $102-146K, 21-30% $80-102K, 31-40% $64-80K, 41-50% $50-64K, lower 50% $0-50K)

The second option is locations by demographics which targets tiers of household incomes.  Many clients are looking for ways to reach a higher income audience and this allows you some degree of control over the situation.  The same caveat as above exists, in that getting granular can have the effect of drying up volume so it is recommended that you use this feature as a layer and increase the bid adjustment. What Google makes clear is that this does not target individual users but instead targets zip codes that fall into the income tiers based on IRS data and is available for the US only.

Each of these options by itself may not be the best solution, but by integrating these groups as layers within your location targeting, you can gain greater control over where you spend your valuable advertising dollars.

Google AdWords Introduces Store Visit Conversions

February 4th, 2015 by John Callery

BLOG-storevisitconversionsGiven the ever-changing nature of digital marketing, 2015 is sure to bring a number of new features and enhancements to the world of PPC advertising. One of the driving forces behind this ongoing evolution of PPC is the growing need for accurate, reliable data that provides better insights into the true impact of digital ad campaigns.

People are constantly connected in today’s multi-device world, which makes it even more important for a business to understand how their online marketing efforts influence consumer interaction once potential customers are offline. Recent studies indicate that 65-70% of consumers have visited a store after seeing a local search ad online. Furthermore, 68% of U.S. internet users were likely to research a product online and then purchase it at a physical store during this past holiday season. This combination of online and offline shopping has forced digital marketers to reconsider performance and ROI measurement when it comes to advertising online.

Consumers might be inclined to visit a store and make a purchase after seeing ads from certain campaigns or on certain devices, and ignoring these purchases could cause a business to drastically underestimate the power and influence of their digital advertising campaigns. During the past year, Google has steadily improved cross-device and offline conversion tracking in an effort to eliminate the disconnection between PPC ad clicks and in-store visits. Over the next few weeks, they plan to start offering eligible businesses throughout the U.S their latest enhancement to conversion tracking: store visit conversions.

This new metric will represent the estimated number of store visits that occur after a visitor sees a PPC ad online, and the data it will provide should make the offline and multi-device conversion estimates in AdWords even more powerful and accurate. Knowing what campaigns, ad types and devices drive people to visit a store will ultimately allow businesses to make better decisions regarding the direction and scope of their digital advertising.

In order to be eligible to measure store visit conversions, businesses must meet a few basic requirements:

  • Have a Google My Business account that is linked to their Google AdWords account.
  • Set up location extensions that use the listing(s) from their My Business account.
  • Consistently receive a large number of ad clicks and store visits.
  • Have multiple physical retail locations in the U.S.

If your business meets these requirements, store visit data will be available at the campaign level without any additional set up required. Google doesn’t specify what they consider a “large number of ad clicks or store visits”, nor do they give specifics regarding the number of physical locations a business must have in order to qualify. Regardless, advertisers should keep an eye out for this new conversion data in the coming weeks if their business meets the above requirements.

By giving us a more complete representation of the impact that PPC advertising can have on a business, this new conversion metric should provide some powerful insights that will become more important to digital marketers as we move into 2015.