Enhance Your Google Ads with AdWords Structured Snippets

July 12th, 2016 by Cary Goldstein

BLOG-enhance-your-ads-with-adwords-structured-snippets (1)Google introduced an Ad Extension type awhile back, which allows advertisers to include additional content highlighting specific aspects of your products and services. This feature provides the ability to call attention to a variety of data elements that should be applicable to most business models within a number of pre-defined Headers listed below:

  • Amenities
  • Brands
  • Courses
  • Degree Programs
  • Destinations
  • Featured Hotels
  • Insurance Coverage
  • Neighborhoods
  • Service Catalog
  • Shows
  • Styles
  • Types

You have the flexibility to choose which specific customized values to then include under a particular Header such as the individual Brand names of the products you offer, or the styles of clothing, as two examples. In addition, AdWords Structured Snippet extensions allow the flexibility of scheduling options which include specific start and end date, day of the week and hours of the day which can be valuable controls. You also have the ability to produce Mobile preferred snippets, if desired.

These additional insights into your specific products and services can help increase click-through rates in addition to improving the quality of traffic to your website. It’s important to remember that Ad Extensions typically boost the performance of your Ads, and are also a factor in the overall Ad Rank. While Ad Extensions are not always eligible to show, the more you have implemented, the better each auction is able to select the most effective combinations of extensions to help improve overall performance. Adding these new Structured Snippet extensions into the mix provides another opportunity to further enhance the impact of Google AdWords Ad Extensions on your account performance.

Use Keywords in Your Google AdWords and Bing Ads Shopping Campaigns

February 22nd, 2016 by Jack ODonnell

BLOG-Use-Keywords-In-Shopping-CampaignsCurrently, we cannot use specific keywords as targeting mechanisms in Shopping campaigns (other than those keywords you use in your Titles and Descriptions), but that doesn’t mean you still can’t harness the power of keywords to improve the performance of your Shopping campaigns.

The power of negative keywords, that is.

Use the Search terms report available to you in the Google AdWords interface to run a report which will show you which search terms were actually used by an end user to trigger your Shopping Ads to show in the search results. The Search terms report for Google AdWords is found under Keywords>>Search Terms when you are within a Shopping campaign. Once you pick the desired time-frame you want to view, you can simply put a check-mark into the selection boxes of those keywords you want to add as negative keywords, then add them as either Campaign negatives or Ad Group negatives. By culling through these keywords, you will be able to exclude those keywords that don’t convert , or exclude those keywords that are simply not a good fit for the products your client is trying to sell, and thus avoid wasting your PPC spend on non-productive traffic.

For Bing, you will need to navigate to the Dimensions tab and look under the Search Term column to see the actual search terms being used that trigger for Bing Shopping ads to show in the search results. You can export this data, filter through the data to find the appropriate negative keywords, and then copy and paste the desired negative keywords into the appropriate Bing Shopping campaign.

So don’t forget to use the negative power of keywords in your Google Shopping and Bing Shopping campaigns.

Google AdWords RLSA (Remarketing Lists for Search Ads)

October 12th, 2015 by Steve Butler

BLOG-Google-RLSABy now most all digital advertisers know of the power of Remarketing (a.k.a. Retargeting). Remarketing works because it creates a constant digital reminder to people who had previously expressed interest in the product or service that you provide. If you’re doing Remarketing already, Google AdWords RLSA builds onto the Remarketing backbone that you already have in place.

It’s not a secret that most shoppers don’t purchase a product the first time that they visit your site. Many shoppers will visit your site and your competitors as they progress from research and eventually into the purchase mode. The fact that they’ve visited your site before and are looking again for your product is typically a strong indication that the shopper is closer to the moment of purchase. RLSA allows you to identify these past visitors, and then bid more aggressively for them when they do a search.

Implementation Steps:
Adding RLSA is only possible after you’ve made the Remarketing audience(s) available to your Search campaign(s). This can be done directly in the AdWords interface, but is more easily accomplished via AdWords Editor. The following steps should allow you to quickly add the audiences into the Campaigns and Ad Groups that you feel most likely to see value from this process:

  1. Open up AdWords Editor and Enter CID or search by account name.
  2. Filter campaigns for Search Network Only.
  3. Go to Keywords and targeting under MANAGE, and select Audiences.
  4. Click on +Audiences.
  5. Select all campaigns that you want to add RLSA to, click OK.
  6. Remarketing Lists > Select the lists you want to add, click OK.
  7. Click on Edit ad group flexible reach; Highlight all ad groups (Command+ A).
  8. Under Interest and Remarketing, select Bid Only (instead of target and bid). This is VERY important. Do NOT select Target & Bid as you will get far different results.
  9. Check that Bid Only is applied to all audiences by going back to ‘Audiences’ and seeing that each list has Bid Only under targeting.
  10. Post changes.
  11. Check in the account again, under Audiences that the lists were applied to all campaigns with Bid Only.
  12. Set bid adjustments (positive or negative).

Once the audiences are in place, you’ll be able to review the performance of these past visitors at any time by clicking on the Audiences Tab. Here you’ll see how these past visitors have performed and then compare their results to the performance of those who had not been to your site before. If you find that past visitors do perform well, increase the bid multiplier. If you find that they perform more poorly, decrease the bid multiplier.

It is also possible to use RLSA as a way to filter out people who are unlikely to buy from you. Assume that your product is one that is generally purchased only once and never again. RLSA would allow you to exclude an audience of past buyers so that even if they were looking again, your ads would not show.

The use of RLSA can fit many situations. Some examples might include:

  • A typical campaign that is restricted to Phrase and Exact match keywords only can be modified to include Broad match keywords as long as the shopper has already shown interest in your products/services by visiting your site previously.
  • Visitors to a site’s golf shoes page(s) might be targeted again with more aggressive bids should those same customers now be looking for golf clubs. Look for cross selling opportunities like this to enhance the reach with shoppers who have a known relevancy to your business.

Implementing RLSA is quick and easy, but using it wisely requires some thought. Reach out to a reputable PPC management agency today to discuss how RLSA can help improve your results.